Survey: Shoppers expect more in-store technology

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Survey: Shoppers expect more in-store technology

By Gina Acosta - 07/12/2019
When it comes to in-store technologies, most retailers are lagging behind consumer awareness of them in terms of providing an experience involving one or more, the data show.

Retailers are missing opportunities to introduce in-store technology to their customers, according to a new study.

The 2019 Consumer Retail Technology Survey from research firm A.T. Kearney shows that retailers are falling short of consumer expectations when it comes to technology and the bricks-and-mortar shopping experience.

"Of necessity, bricks-and-mortar retailers have had to maintain a relentless focus on keeping up with their pure play counterparts in ecommerce, and so in-store technology has been the casualty of that single-mindedness,” said Suketu Gandhi, partner in the Digital Transformation practice of A.T. Kearney. “But now is the time for physical stores to step back, gain an understanding of their in-store technology options and develop pilots that support their specific business model."

The survey reports that while 75% of consumers are aware of at least one retail technology, only 33% have experienced any. When it comes to in-store technologies, most retailers are lagging behind consumer awareness of them in terms of providing an experience involving one or more, the data show.

The survey focused on five critical technologies emerging in physical stores: augmented reality, mobile point of sale, cashierless checkout, interactive screens and 3D printing.

The research also identified a divide in terms of store type.

Around 45% of respondents reported visiting a big box store because of a technological aspect of the shopping experience, while 24% said their visit to a specialty store was motivated by technology.

In addition, nearly 50% of consumers surveyed expect their shopping choices to be more influenced by technology in the future.

"This finding suggests that retailers still have the opportunity to address and meet consumer expectations by bridging the awareness-experience gap," says Greg Portell, global consumer and retail practice lead at A.T. Kearney.

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